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Meet Nick Avallone, MD, Orthopedic Surgeon
February 10, 2020

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Dr. Avallone specializes in minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery of the shoulder, knee, elbow and ankle.  He performs rotator cuff and labral repairs of the shoulder and ligament reconstruction surgeries such as ACL reconstruction of the knee and the Tommy John surgery of the elbow.  He also performs a variety of joint replacement surgeries of the shoulder, according to the patient’s needs, including the reverse total shoulder replacement. 

His goal as a physician is simple:

“What I love about being a surgeon is taking a team approach to provide the most up-to-date medical advances to get people back to doing the things they love to do, whether it’s return to a sport or just getting back to the game of life,” he says. “That gives me great happiness.”

He traces this passion back to the fifth grade when his brother broke an ankle playing football. “I was amazed that the orthopedic surgeon was able to repair his ankle and get him back on the field that season” says Dr. Avallone, a former collegiate athlete himself. 

Dr. Avallone serves as the Medical Director of Sports Medicine and the Chief of Orthopedic Surgery at St. Luke's Warren Campus and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery at the Temple School of Medicine. 

He is fellowship-trained in Orthopedic Sports Medicine and is board-certified in both Orthopedic Surgery and Orthopedic Sports Medicine.  He has been named as a "Top Doc" in New Jersey by Inside Jersey and Jersey’s Best magazines.  Dr. Avallone is the head team physician for multiple high schools in New Jersey.

He graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University, earned his medical degree from Rutgers - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and completed the Harvard Combined Orthopedic Residency Program in Boston as well as the sports medicine fellowship at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. 

 

“My promise to my patients is to treat everyone with an individual focus to help them get better,” says Dr. Avallone.